1) WHAT IS GLOBAL WARMING?

Global warming is a phenomenon of climate change characterized by a general increase in the Earth's average temperatures, which modifies the weather balances and ecosystems for a long time. It is directly linked to the increase of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, worsening the greenhouse effect.

2) UNDERSTANDING REAL CAUSE OF GLOBAL WARMING

The main cause of global warming is our treatment of Nature.


Why have warnings about climate change been ignored for more than 20 years?
Why was ever more scientific evidence demanded to find the coherence of man-made CO2 emissions as a cause of global warming? Why wasn't common sense reason enough to act?
The true cause of global warming is our thoughtless attitude to Nature.
Why can one still today find people who stick their head in the sand and don't want to understand what's going on in the earth's atmosphere?
Why do most people refuse to change their behaviour voluntary to reduce CO2 emissions caused by their activities?
The answer to all these questions is a rather simple one:

In our technology and the scientific-minded world, we seem to have forgotten that mankind is only a relatively minor part of Nature. We ignore being part of a larger whole.

We believe to be able to control Nature instead of trying to arrange ourselves with Nature. This haughtiness is the true main cause of global warming. Some people still believe that technical solutions alone would be sufficient to fight global warming.

3. The evidence for rapid climate change is compelling

Global temperature rise
The planet's average surface temperature has risen about 2.0 degrees Fahrenheit (1.1 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century
The planet's average surface temperature has risen about 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century, a change driven largely by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere.4 Most of the warming occurred in the past 35 years, with the five warmest years on record taking place since 2010. Not only was 2016 the warmest year on record, but eight of the 12 months that make up the year — from January through September, except for June — were the warmest on record for those respective months. 

Warming oceans
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of more than 0.4 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of more than 0.4 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.
Shrinking ice sheets
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost an average of 286 billion tons of ice per year between 1993 and 2016, while Antarctica lost about 127 billion tons of ice per year during the same time period. The rate of Antarctica ice mass loss has tripled in the last decade.7
Image: Flowing meltwater from the Greenland ice sheet
Glacial retreat
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world — including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world — including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.8
Image: The disappearing snowcap of Mount Kilimanjaro, from space.
Decreased snow cover
Satellite observations reveal that the amount of spring snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere has decreased over the past five decades and that the snow is melting earlier
Satellite observations reveal that the amount of spring snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere has decreased over the past five decades and that the snow is melting earlier.
Sea level rise
Global sea level rose about 8 inches in the last century. The rate in the last two decades, however, is nearly double that of the last century and is accelerating slightly every year
Global sea level rose about 8 inches in the last century. The rate in the last two decades, however, is nearly double that of the last century and is accelerating slightly every year.10
Image: Republic of Maldives: Vulnerable to sea-level rise
Declining Arctic sea ice

Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.11
Image: Visualization of the 2012 Arctic sea ice minimum, the lowest on record

Extreme events
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world — including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.
The number of records high-temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low-temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950. The U.S. has also witnessed increasing numbers of intense rainfall events.

Ocean acidification
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 per cent
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 per cent.13,14 This increase is the result of humans emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being absorbed into the oceans. The amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the upper layer of the oceans is increasing by about 2 billion tons per year.

4. What should be each individual’s role to avoid it?

The goal is simple. Carbon dioxide is the climate’s worst enemy. It’s released when oil, coal, and other fossil fuels are burned for energy—the energy we use to power our homes, cars, and smartphones. By using less of it, we can curb our contribution to climate change while also saving money. Here are a dozen easy, effective ways each one of us can make a difference:

1. Speak up!
What’s the single biggest way you can make an impact on global climate change? “Talk to your friends and family, and make sure your representatives are making good decisions,” Haq says. 
2. Power your home with renewable energy.
Choose a utility company that generates at least half its power from wind or solar and has been certified by Green-e Energy, an organization that vets renewable energy options. If that isn’t possible for you, take a look at your electric bill; many utilities now list other ways to support renewable sources on their monthly statements and websites.
3. Weatherize, weatherize, weatherize.
“Building heating and cooling are among the biggest uses of energy,” Haq says. Indeed, heating and air-conditioning account for almost half of home energy use. You can make your space more energy efficient by sealing drafts and ensuring it’s adequately insulated. You can also claim federal tax credits for many energy-efficiency home improvements.
4. Invest in energy-efficient appliances.
Since they were first implemented nationally in 1987, efficiency standards for dozens of appliances and products have kept 2.3 billion tons of carbon dioxide out of the air. 5. Reduce water waste.
Saving water reduces carbon pollution, too. That's because it takes a lot of energy to pump, heat, and treat your water. So take shorter showers, turn off the tap while brushing your teeth, and switch to WaterSense-labeled fixtures and appliances. 
6. Eat the food you buy—and make less of it meat.
Approximately 10 per cent of U.S. energy use goes into growing, processing, packaging, and shipping food—about 40 per cent of which just winds up in the landfill. 
7. Buy better bulbs.
LED light bulbs use up to 80 per cent less energy than conventional incandescents. They’re also cheaper in the long run: A 10-watt LED that replaces your traditional 60-watt bulb will save you $125 over the lightbulb’s life.
8. Pull the plug(s).
Taken together, the outlets in your home are likely powering about 65 different devices—an average load for a home in the U.S. Audio and video devices, cordless vacuums and power tools, and other electronics use energy even when they're not charging. 
9. Drive a fuel-efficient vehicle.
Gas-smart cars, such as hybrids and fully electric vehicles, save fuel and money. And once all cars and light trucks meet 2025’s clean car standards, which means averaging 54.5 miles per gallon, they’ll be a mainstay. 
10. Maintain your ride.
If all Americans kept their tires properly inflated, we could save 1.2 billion gallons of gas each year. A simple tune-up can boost miles per gallon anywhere from 4 per cent to 40 per cent, and a new air filter can get you a 10 per cent boost.

5. Global warming solutions
Good news - there are ways to reduce global warming. But how can climate change be reversed? What solutions to consider?

1.Renewable energies
The first way to prevent climate change is to move away from fossil fuels. What are the alternatives? Renewable energies like solar, wind, biomass and geothermal.
Energy efficiency icon
2.Energy & water efficiency
Producing clean energy is essential, but reducing our consumption of energy and water by using more efficient devices (e.g. LED light bulbs, innovative shower system) is less costly and equally important.

3.Sustainable transportation
Promoting public transportation, carpooling, and electric and hydrogen mobility can help reduce CO2 emissions and thus fight global warming.
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4.Sustainable infrastructure
To reduce the CO2 emissions from buildings - caused by heating, air conditioning, hot water or lighting - building new low energy buildings and renovating the existing constructions is necessary.
5.Sustainable agriculture & forest management
Encouraging better use of natural resources, stopping massive deforestation, and making agriculture greener and more efficient should also be a priority.
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6.Responsible consumption & recycling
Adopting responsible consumption habits is crucial, be it regarding food (particularly meat), clothing, cosmetics or cleaning products. Last but not least, recycling is an absolute necessity for dealing with waste.